Top Menu

Principal Deputy Assistant AG Cronan Delivers Yet Another FCPA Speech

Cronan

On October 18th, Principal Deputy Assistant Attorney General John Cronan delivered a speech in Brazil at an event hosted by a for-profit business that generally charges people to attend (see here for the prior post). On October 25th, Cronan delivered another speech in Washington, D.C. at another event hosted by the same for-profit business.

Why DOJ (and SEC) officials allows themselves to be used in such a way by profit-seeking businesses to drive attendance to their events is beyond me. (See prior posts here and here, among many others, for why the selling of FCPA enforcement attorneys needs to stop).

Ethics aside, in his speech Cronan talked about the DOJ’s priorities with respect to corporate enforcement, what the DOJ expects “from companies who choose to voluntarily self-disclose misconduct and seek to cooperate with law enforcement,” and the DOJ’s “commitment to reaching fair and equitable resolutions, including through the principles reflected in the Criminal Division’s policy with respect to monitors.”

Continue Reading

A Game Of Cat And Mouse

catandmouse

The DOJ has long talked about how “greater transparency benefits everyone” (see here).

In this May 2017 speech, a high-ranking DOJ official talked about “the importance of transparency in our anti-corruption prosecutions.”

In this August 2017 speech, a high-ranking DOJ official stated: “We are taking additional steps to enhance our enforcement of the FCPA against both corporate and individual actors, and to promote transparency in doing so.”

In announcing its November 2017 FCPA Corporate Enforcement Policy (see here) the DOJ talked about greater “clarity about our decision-making process” and the “advantage of the policy for businesses is to provide transparency about the benefits available if they satisfy the requirements.”

Against this backdrop, if the DOJ is truly committed to transparency and clarity in the FCPA context, why does it continue to play cat and mouse games with the business community about terms and conditions it uses in describing its own enforcement policies?

Continue Reading

Issues To Consider From The Credit Suisse Enforcement Action

Issues

This post highlighted the recent $77 million Foreign Corrupt Practices Act enforcement action against Credit Suisse concerning its internship and hiring practices involving family members of alleged Chinese “foreign officials.” This post continues the analysis by highlighting additional issues to consider.

Timeline

Credit Suisse’s FCPA scrutiny appears to have begun in late 2013 (see here). Thus from start to finish, its scrutiny lasted approximately 4.5 years.

Continue Reading

SEC Potpourri

SEC

A suggestion for the SEC and excerpts from a recent speech by Steven Peikin (Co-Director, Division of Enforcement) on effective communication with the SEC.

Suggestion for the SEC

As highlighted here, the SEC recently launched SEC Action Lookup for Individuals (SALI) “that enables investors to research whether the person trying to sell them investments has a judgment or order entered against them in an enforcement action. The new tool is intended to assist the public in making informed investment decisions and avoiding financial fraud.”

Continue Reading

FCPA Flash – A Conversation With Kevin Muhlendorf

Podcast Logo

The FCPA Flash podcast provides in an audio format the same fresh, candid, and informed commentary about the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act and related topics as readers have come to expect from written posts on FCPA Professor.

This FCPA Flash episode is a conversation with Kevin Muhlendorf (Wiley Rein and former Assistant Chief in the Fraud Section of the DOJ’s Criminal Division and former Senior Counsel in the SEC’s Enforcement Division). During the podcast, Muhlendorf discusses: the DOJ and SEC’s FCPA enforcement programs; FCPA enforcement and the rule of law; whether business organizations cooperate too much in FCPA enforcement actions including as to statute of limitation issues; and whether the FCPA – as it approaches forty – has been successful.

Continue Reading

Powered by WordPress. Designed by WooThemes