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Africa Sting – DOJ Moves To Dismiss Charges Against Spiller, Geri And Alvirez

[This post has been updated]

In February, when Judge Richard Leon granted the DOJ’s motion to dismiss charges against the remaining Africa Sting defendants (see here for the prior post), an open question was what would happen to Jonathan Spiller, Haim Geri and Daniel Alvirez.  All three defendants previously plead guilty to a charge of conspiracy to violate the FCPA, a charge Judge Leon dismissed as to all defendants in the second Africa Sting trial in December 2011.  In addition, Alvirez also plead guilty to non-sting, real-world conduct related to the Republic of Georgia.

The question has been answered.

Earlier today, the DOJ moved (see here) to dismiss, with prejudice, the Africa Sting charges against Spiller, Geri, and Alvirez.  Moreover, the DOJ moved to dismiss, without prejudice, the Republic of Georgia charges against Alvirez.  The DOJ filing states as follows.  “The government has also concluded that it is in the interests of justice not to prosecute defendant Alvirez on the Georgia conspiracy count at this time, but rather to continue the investigation of that and related conduct.  Following such investigation, the government will determine whether to bring criminal charges relating to the conduct.”

Asa Hutchinson (here – Asa Hutchinson Law Group) counsel for Alvirez stated as follows. “We applaud the government’s decision to dismiss all charges in the interest of justice.  This case in its entirety was  plagued with problems.  The government recognized those problems and acted fairly to dismiss all remaining charges.  We are hopeful and expectant that the dismissal will end this case.”

Ken Wainstein (here – O’Melveny & Myers) counsel for Spiller stated as follows.  “We are very gratified that the Justice Department prosecutors ended their case against Mr. Spiller.  This was a difficult decision for them—one of many difficult decisions faced by Mr. Spiller and the prosecutors throughout this case—and I admire them for getting to the fair and just result.  Jonathan Spiller is a good man, and it is only right that he be cleared of these charges.”  Spiller stated as follows.  “I am so glad that this painful episode in my life is now over and that the government decided to do the right thing in dismissing the charges against me. I have tried all along to do what I felt was right and all I want now is to go on with my life. Thank you to everyone that has stood by me and believed in me through this process, especially my lawyers, my friends, and my fiancée.”

Eric Bruce and Matthew Menchel (here and here – Kobre & Kim) counsel for Geri stated as follows.  “We commend the Department of Justice in making the appropriate decision to dismiss all charges against Mr. Geri.  It would have been a grave injustice for Mr. Geri  to be branded a felon as a result of this failed sting operation.  Haim Geri is a good and decent man, who can now put this unfortunate chapter behind him and start rebuilding his life.”

During today’s hearing on the DOJ’s motion, a knowledgeable source informed that Judge Leon indicated he will grant the motion and defense counsel and the DOJ are working to prepare an order for Judge Leon to sign dismissing the charges (as noted above) and vacating the prior guilty pleas.

When Judge Leon grants the motion, the DOJ’s record in the Africa Sting case (a case Assistant Attorney General Lanny Breuer called a “turning point”) will be 0-22.

See here for my recent publication “What Percentage of DOJ FCPA Losses is Acceptable?”  To borrow from Justice Potter Stewart’s classic reasoning in Jacobellis v. Ohio, I don’t know what level of DOJ FCPA losses is acceptable and the answer may be  indefinable. But I know it when I see it, and the number and magnitude of DOJ’s  recent FCPA losses is unacceptable.

Armor Holdings Resolves Enforcement Action / BAE Avoids Successor Liability

In February 2009, Richard Bistrong a former employee of Armor Holdings Inc. (a former publicly-traded company, currently a subsidiary of BAE Systems) pleaded guilty to charges he conspired with others to, among other things, obtain United Nations body armor contracts valued at $6 million by causing his employer to pay $200,000 in commissions to an agent while knowing that the agent would pass along a portion of that money to a United Nations procurement officer (a “foreign official” under the FCPA) to cause the officer to award the contracts. (See here and here for the prior posts).

Bistrong then became an informant for the government and helped the FBI manufacture an entirely different case – the Africa Sting case – against, among others, Jonathan Spiller (the former CEO and President of Armor Holdings and Bistrong’s boss) and Stephen Gerard Giordanella (formerly associated with Armor Holdings). Spiller, who testified at the first Africa Sting trial that resulted in a mistrial (see here for the prior post) is one of the Africa Sting defendants that has pleaded guilty. Giordanella is scheduled for a September trial.

Yesterday, in a related development, the DOJ and SEC announced an FCPA enforcement against Armor Holdings. Total fines and penalties are approximately $16 million ($10.3 million via a DOJ non-prosecution agreement and $5.7 million via a settled SEC civil complaint).

That the DOJ would resolve the matter solely against Armor Holdings without also holding BAE accountable stands in stark contrast to other recent FCPA enforcement actions where the DOJ has used successor liability theories against acquiring companies (see here for the 2010 enforcement action against Alliance One International for instance). But then again, in 2010 the DOJ resolved an enforcement action against BAE – one that per the DOJ’s own allegations directly implicated the FCPA’s anti-bribery provisions – without FCPA charges. See here for the prior post.

This post analyzes both the DOJ and SEC enforcement actions against Armor Holdings.

DOJ

The NPA (here) begins as follows.

The DOJ “will not criminally prosecute Armor Holdings, Inc., or any of its present or former parents, subsidiaries, or affiliates for any crimes … related to the making of, and agreement to make, improper payments by Armor employees and agents to a procurement official of the United Nations in connection with efforts to obtain and retain body armor contracts for an Armor subsidiary from the U.N. in 2011 and 2003, and related accounting and record-keeping associated with these improper payments …”.

The NPA has a term of two years. As is typical in FCPA NPAs or DPAs, Armor agreed “not to make any public statement contradicting” the described conduct.

According to the NPA, the DOJ agreed to resolve the action via an NPA based, in part, on the following factors.

(a) Armor’s complete disclosure of the facts at issue;

(b) Armor’s self-investigation and cooperation with the DOJ and SEC;

(c) “the fact that all of the conduct [at issue] took place prior to the acquisition of Armor by BAE Systems; and

(d) “the extensive remedial efforts undertaken by Armor, before and after Armor’s acquisition by BAE Systems, including but not limited to terminating the Armor employees who were involved in the misconduct; terminating approximately 1,700 international sales representatives and distributors of Armor Holdings Products LLC immediately after the acquisition closed; conducting extensive FCPA compliance training for over 1,000 Armor employees; implementing BAE Systems’ due diligence protocols and review processes for any new Armor foreign sales representatives and distributors; and applying BAE Systems’ compliance policies and internal controls to all Armor businesses.”

According to the Statement of Facts in the NPA, “Armor manufactured security products, vehicle armor systems, protective equipment and other products for use, primarily, by military, law enforcement, security and corrections personnel.” The conduct at issue focuses on Armor Holdings Products Group (“Products Group”), which was a wholly owned division of Armor, Bistrong (Product Group’s Vice President for International Sales) and Armor Products International Ltd. (“API”), which was a wholly owned subsidiary of Armor that was a part of the Products Group and headquartered in the U.K.

Under the heading “Improper Conduct” the NPA states as follows. From 2001 to 2006, “API and its employees and agents made corrupt payments to a United Nations procurement official to induce that official to provide non-public, inside information to API, and to cause the U.N. to award body armor contracts to API.” The NPA further states that “Armor employees falsely recorded the nature and purpose of these improper payments, as well as other payments, in Armor’s books and records.”

Under the heading “Books and Records” the NPA states as follows. From 2001 to 2006, “Bistrong, Products Employee A and others caused the Products Group to keep off Armor’s books and records approximately $4.4 million in payments to agents and other third-party intermediaries used by the Products Group to assist it it obtaining business from foreign government customers.”

Pursuant to the NPA, the DOJ agreed not to prosecute Armor based on the above described conduct if it complies with the compliance-related obligations set forth in the NPA. In an interesting sentence similar to the recent Tenaris DOJ NPA, the DOJ also agreed not to prosecute Armor for conduct “Armor specifically disclosed to the DOJ in meetings during its voluntary disclosure from March 2007 to December 2010.” This sentence suggests that Armor disclosed other conduct to the DOJ in addition to the conduct described above.

See here for the DOJ’s release announcing the enforcement action. Among other things, the release states as follows. “Due to Armor’s implementation of BAE’s due diligence protocols and review processes, its application of BAE’s compliance policies and internal controls to all Armor businesses, its extensive remediation and improvement of its compliance systems and internal controls, as well as the enhanced compliance undertakings included in the agreement, Armor is not required to retain a corporate monitor. Armor will be required to report to the department on implementation of its remediation and enhanced compliance efforts every six months for the duration of the agreement.”

SEC

The SEC’s settled civil complaint (here) is based on the same core conduct described above.

In summary, the complaint states as follows. “From 2001 through 2006, certain agents of Armor Holdings participated in a bribery scheme in which corrupt payments were authorized to be made to an official of the United Nations (“U.N.”), for the purpose ofobtaining and retaining U.N. business. Armor Holdings generated more than $7.1 million in improper revenues, and realized over $1.5 million in improper profits, through the award of U.N. body armor contracts to its subsidiary during this period. From 2001 through June 2007, another Armor Holdings subsidiary employed an accounting practice that disguised in its books and records approximately $4,371,278 in commissions paid to intermediaries who brokered the sale of goods to foreign governments. By virtue of this conduct, Armor Holdings violated the anti-bribery, books and records, and internal controls provisions of the FCPA and the Exchange Act.”

In an SEC release (here), Robert Khuzami (Director of the SEC’s Division of Enforcement) stated that “illicit payments to U.N. officials are no less reprehensible than bribes to foreign government officials.” As noted in the SEC release, Armor, without admitting or denying the SEC’s allegations, consented to the entry of a permanent injunction against further FCPA violations and agreed to pay $1,552,306 in disgorgement, $458,438 in prejudgment interest, and a civil monetary penalty of $3,680,000.

The SEC release also contains the following summary statistic. “Since 2010, the SEC has filed 32 FCPA cases, including the case against Armor Holdings, and obtained more than $600 million in penalties, disgorgement and interest.”

Roger Witten and Kimberly Parker (here and here of Wilmer Cutler Pickering Hale and Dorr) represented Armor Holdings.

Africa Sting – Superseding Indictment, Additional Guilty Plea Expected

During a February hearing, Judge Richard Leon, the judge assigned to the Africa Sting cases, reportedly said he had “zero sense that there was an omnibus grand conspiracy” alleged in the 16 separate indictments charging 22 individuals with, among other things, conspiracy to violate the FCPA and substantive FCPA violations (see here). Judge Leon also reportedly told the DOJ that “what you think is so transparent is not” and he urged the DOJ to “take a step back” given that the DOJ may be so “close to trees that it can’t see the forest.” (see here).

The DOJ presumably took a step back, went back to the grand jury, and the grand jury returned a superseding indictment (see here) charging, among other things, all 22 individual defendants in one big conspiracy to violate the FCPA.

The superseding indictment, unlike the previously filed superseding indictment against Daniel Alvirez (see here), does not add much in terms of substance, although it does contain greater detail regarding certain e-mails, meetings, and telephone calls relevant to the conduct at issue compared to the original indictments. Further, this allegation in the superseding indictment was not apparent from the original indictments – “the defendants would agree that the products they would supply in connection with Phase One [of the deal] would be consolidated for shipment to Country A.”

Judge Leon previously indicated that he would not try 22 individuals together in one case. In response, the DOJ has proposed a “reasonable division” of the defendants into four groups. (See here and here for more).

Also, Christopher Matthews of Main Justice, who attended today’s court hearing, is reporting (here) that another defendant, Jonathan Spiller, is in plea agreement talks with the DOJ and is likely to plead guilty. Matthews reports that neither Spiller, nor his counsel, were present at today’s hearing.

Africa Sting – The Charges

Set forth below is a summary of the 16 indictments announced yesterday charging 22 individuals in connection with the “Africa Sting.”

The Africa Sting case charges individuals across a wide business spectrum.

It involves individuals employed by large companies and small companies; private companies and publicly-traded companies. It involves Chief Executive Officers, Sales Managers, and even a General Counsel. It involves U.S. citizens, U.K. citizens, an Israeli citizen, and a pair of siblings. It involves agents and consultants, and of course, undercover FBI agents posing as representatives of an imaginary Minister of Defense of an African country.

At present, this case only involves individuals.

However, as indicated by Assistant Attorney General Breuer in yesterday’s DOJ release (here) the investigation is “ongoing” and you can bet that many of the companies which employ these individuals are “lawyering up” as past FCPA enforcement actions demonstrate the corporate enforcement actions or investigations often, but not always, precede or follow individual enforcement actions.

As to any potential corporate enforcement action, the websites of several of the companies employing the indicted individuals make specific reference to the company being a U.S. General Services Administration vendor. “Under guidelines issued by the Office of Management and Budget, a person or firm found in violation of the FCPA may be barred from doing business with the Federal government.” (see here).

However, this sanction (to my knowledge) has never been used against an FCPA violator – not even Siemens (see here). Thus, should corporate enforcement actions ensue, this will be an interesting issue to follow.

Given that one of the individuals indicted is employed by a public-company issuer, the SEC may also be interested in that company from, at the very least, an FCPA books and records and internal control perspective.

Given the number of individuals indicted, and the motivations for pleading under the Sentencing Guidelines, it would seem inevitable that one or more individuals will soon “flip” and cooperate with the government thereby potentially complicating the defenses of the remaining individuals.

All charges have been filed in the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia and assigned to Judge Richard J. Leon (see here).

As evident below, each of the indictments generally follow the same template, allege the core conduct, and charge the same offenses, including conspiracy to violate the FCPA and substantive FCPA violations.

At present, the indictments are only allegations and the individuals are presumed innocent. There is, of course, a very human event in this case and the lives of the indicted individuals (and countless more when you include family and friends) were turned upside down this week.

Stay tuned for a future post as to the “questions” raised by these indictments.

Daniel Alvirez and Lee Allen Tolleson

Alvirez (see here for his background) is described in the indictment as “the President of Company A, an Arkansas company based in Bull Shoals, Arkansas, that manufactured and sold law enforcement and military equipment.”

The company is ALS Technologies, Inc. (see here for its background and here for the company’s press releases on this issue).

According to the indictment, Tolleson “was the Director of Acquisitions and Logistics.”

According to the indictment, between approximately May 2009 – December 2009, Alvirez and Tolleson “would participate in meetings and have discussions” in which Individual 1 (a “business associate of Alvirez and Tolleson” (as well as most the other indicted individuals) and an “former Vice President of International Sales for a company that manufactured and supplied law enforcement and military equipment to law enforcement and military customers around the world”) “said that a friend of his, who was a self-employed sales agent” was tasked by the Minister of Defense of an African country “with obtaining various defense articles for outfitting” the country’s presidential guard.

According to the indictment, “in reality, the self-employed sales agent” was an undercover FBI special agent “posing as a representative of the Minister of Defense” of the African country.

According to the indictment, an object of the scheme was for Alvirez and Tolleson to obtain and attempt to obtain business for their company and themselves by making corrupt payments to the “sales agent” (the undercover FBI agent) who was “consulting” on a sale by the company to the Minister of Defense.

Pursuant to this arrangement, the indictment alleges that Aliverz and Tolleson would agree to pay the “sales agent” “a 20% ‘commission’ in connection with two contract to sell grenades and grenade launchers to the Minister of Defense” “knowing that half of the ‘commission’ was intended to be paid as a bribe to the Minister of Defense” and “half was intended to be split between” Individual 1 and the “sales agent” “as a fee for their corrupt services.”

According to the indictment, money for these payments would be generated through inflating the true price of the grenades and grenade launchers by 20%.

As part of the scheme, the indictment alleges that Alvirez and Tolleson would pay this “commission” into the “sales agent” U.S. bank account “knowing that half of the commission was intended to be paid outside of the United States as a bribe to the Minister of Defense.”

According to the indictment, the business deal was worth approximately $15 million and “would involve several suppliers.” The indictment alleges that on or about May 13, 2009, Alvirez and Tolleson agreed to proceed with the deal per the above-described arrangements and that Alvirez and Tolleson then proceeded to inflate the price quotations, wire the commission, and otherwise take action in furtherance of the deal.

The indictment alleges that on or about October 5, 2009, Alvirez and Tolleson were told by another FBI special agent “posing as a procurement officer” for the African country’s Minister of Defense and “who purportedly reported directly to the Minister of Defense” (the Second FBI Agent) that the “Minister of Defense was pleased with the grenade launchers” sent and the “commission the Minister of Defense had received.” The FBI special agent then allegedly told Alvirez and Tolleson “that the Minister of Defense had given his approval to proceed” with the second phase of the deal. According to the indictment, Alvirez and Tolleson then executed two copies “of the corrupt purchase agreement.”

Based on this core conduct, the indictment charges Alvirez and Tolleson with, among other things, conspiracy to violate the FCPA and two substantive FCPA violations.

Helmie Ashiblie

Ashiblie is described in the indictment as the “Vice President and Founder of Company A, a company that was based in Woodbridge, Virginia, and was in the business of supplying tactical bags and other security-related articles for law enforcement agencies and governments worldwide.”

That company (see here) is i-Shot, Inc.

The allegations against Ashiblie are substantively similar to the above allegations against Alvirez and Tolleson, but involved two contracts to sell “tactical bags”. The indictment alleges that Ashiblie agreed to proceed with the deal and that he then proceeded between August – November 2009 to inflate the price quotations, wire the commission, and otherwise take action in furtherance of the deal.

The indictment also alleges that on or about October 5, 2009, Ashiblie was also told by the Second FBI Agent that the “Minister of Defense was pleased with the tactical bags” sent and the “commission the Minister of Defense had received.” The FBI agent then allegedly told Ashiblie “that the Minister of Defense had given his approval to proceed” with the second phase of the deal. According to the indictment, Ashiblie then executed an additional purchase agreement and sent “thirteen tactical bags for the purpose of having the tactical bags forwarded” to the African country.

Based on this core conduct, the indictment charges Ashiblie with, among other things, conspiracy to violate the FCPA and four substantive FCPA violations.

Ofer Paz

Paz is described in the indictment as a citizen of Israel and the “President and Chief Executive Officer of Company A, an Israel-based company that acts as a sales agent for companies in the law enforcement and military products industries.”

That company is M. Paz Logistics Ltd. (see here).

The allegations against Paz are substantively similar, but involved two contracts to sell “explosives detection kits.” The indictment alleges that Paz agreed to proceed with the deal and that he then proceeded between May – September 2009 to inflate the price quotations, wire the commission, and otherwise take action in furtherance of the deal.

The indictment also alleges that on or about October 5, 2009, Paz was also told by the Second FBI Agent that the “Minister of Defense was pleased with the explosives detection kits” sent and the “commission the Minister of Defense had received.” The FBI agent then allegedly told Paz “that the Minister of Defense had given his approval to proceed” with the second phase of the deal. According to the indictment, Paz then executed the “corrupt purchase agreement.”

Based on this core conduct, the indictment charges Paz with, among other things, conspiracy to violate the FCPA and three substantive FCPA violations.

Andrew Bigelow

Bigelow is described in the indictment as the “Managing Partner and Director of Government Programs for Company A, a company that was based in Sarasota, Florida, and was in the business of selling machine guns, grenade launchers, and other small arms and accessories.”

That company has been identified in media reports as The Gunsearch.com LLC (see here).

The allegations against Bigelow are substantively similar, but involved two contracts to sell “M4 carbine rifles.” The indictment alleges that Bigelow agreed to proceed with the deal and that he then proceeded between May – September 2009 to inflate the price quotations, wire the commission, and otherwise take action in furterance of the deal.

The indictment also alleges that on or about October 5, 2009, Bigelow was also told by the Second FBI Agent that the “Minister of Defense was pleased with the M4 rifles” sent and the “commission the Minister of Defense had received.” The FBI agent then allegedly told Bigelow “that the Minister of Defense had given his approval to proceed” with the second phase of the deal. According to the indictment, Bigelow then executed the “corrupt purchase agreement.”

Based on this core conduct, the indictment charges Bigelow with, among other things, conspiracy to violate the FCPA and two substantive FCPA violations.

R. Patrick Caldwell and Stephen Gerard Giordanella

Caldwell is described in the indictment as the former “Senior Vice President of Sales and Marketing for Company A, a Florida corporation headquartered in Sunrise, Florida, that designed and manufactured concealable and tactical body armor.” According to the indictment, in September 2009, “Caldwell was named Chief Executive Officer of Company A.”

That company is Protective Products of America, Inc. (see here) and (here) for Caldwell’s profile. Of note, Caldwell formerly “served as Deputy Assistant Director, Office of Protective Operations, U.S. Secret Service.”

According to the indictment, Giordanella “was the Chief Executive” of Protective Products “until his resignation on or about March 18, 2009” and from then until at least December 2, 2009 he was a “consultant” for the company.

The allegations against Caldwell and Giordanella are substantively similar, but involved two contracts to sell “body armor plates” The indictment alleges that Caldwell and Giordanella agreed to proceed with the deal and that they then proceeded between May – September 2009 to inflate the price quotations, wire the commission, and otherwise take action in furterance of the deal.

The indictment also alleges that on or about October 5, 2009, Caldwell was also told by the Second FBI Agent that the “Minister of Defense was pleased with the body armor plates” sent and the “commission the Minister of Defense had received.” The FBI agent then allegedly told Caldwell “that the Minister of Defense had given his approval to proceed” with the second phase of the deal. According to the indictment, Caldwell then executed the “corrupt purchase agreement.”

Based on this core conduct, the indictment charges Caldwell and Giordanella with, among other things, conspiracy to violate the FCPA. Caldwell is additionally charged with two substantive FCPA violations.

Haim Geri

Geri is described in the indictment as “the President of Company A, a company based in North Miami Beach, Florida, that serves as a sales agent for companies in the law enforcement and military products industries.”

That company appears to be M.G.S. International Consulting, Inc.

The allegations against Geri are substantively similar, but involved two contracts to sell “the Corner Shot – a special purpose gun accessory that can be used to observe and shoot targets around a corner.” The indictment alleges that Geri agreed to proceed with the deal and that he then proceeded between May – June 2009 to inflate the price quotations, wire the commission, and otherwise take action in furterance of the deal.

The indictment also alleges that on or about October 5, 2009, Geri was also told by the Second FBI Agent that the “Minister of Defense was pleased with the Corner Shot units” sent and the “commission the Minister of Defense had received.” The FBI agent then allegedly told Geri “that the Minister of Defense had given his approval to proceed” with the second phase of the deal. According to the indictment, Geri then executed the “corrupt purchase agreement.”

Based on this core conduct, the indictment charges Geri with, among other things, conspiracy to violate the FCPA and two substantive FCPA violations.

Saul Mishkin

Mishkin is described in the indictment as “the owner and Chief Executive Officer of Company A, a Florida company headquartered in Aventura, Florida, that sold law enforcement and military equipment.”

That company appears to be International Security and Defence Systems (see here).

The allegations against Mishkin are substantively similar, but involved two contracts to sell “riot control suits.” The indictment alleges that Mishkin agreed to proceed with the deal and that he then proceeded between May – September 2009 to inflate the price quotations, wire the commission, and otherwise take action in furterance of the deal.

The indictment also alleges that on or about October 5, 2009, Mishkin was also told by the Second FBI Agent that the “Minister of Defense was pleased with the riot control suits” sent and the “commission the Minister of Defense had received.” The FBI agent then allegedly told Mishkin “that the Minister of Defense had given his approval to proceed” with the second phase of the deal. According to the indictment, Mishkin then executed the “corrupt purchase agreement.”

The Mishkin indictment contains the additional allegation that he was “advised by his attorney that the deal could violate the laws of the United States.” The indictment further alleges that Mishkin then tried to sell the riot control suits indirectly through Individual 1’s company and also contains the allegation that Mishkin also tried to sell “Ready to Eat Meal kits” to Individual 1 pursuant to the same original deal structure even though Mishkin “previously had been advised by his attorney that such a deal could violate the laws of the United States.”

Based on this core conduct, the indictment charges Mishkin with, among other things, conspiracy to violate the FCPA and one substantive FCPA violations.

John Mushriqui and Jeana Mushriqui

John Mushriqui is described in the indictment as “the owner and Director of International Development for Company A, a Pennsylvania company [located in Upper Darby] that was in the business of manufacturing and exporting bulletproof vests and other law enforcement and military equipment.”

Jeana Mushriqui is described as “the General Counsel and United States manager of Company A and the sister of John Mushriqui.”

That company is Mushriqui Consulting LLC (see here).

The allegations against the Mushriquis are substantively similar, but involved two contracts to sell “bulletproof vests.” The indictment alleges that Mushriquis agreed to proceed with the deal and that they then proceeded between May – September 2009 to inflate the price quotations, wire the commission, and otherwise take action in furterance of the deal.

The indictment also alleges that on or about October 5, 2009, the Mushriquis were also told by the Second FBI Agent that the “Minister of Defense was pleased with bulletproof vests” sent and the “commission the Minister of Defense had received.” The FBI agent then allegedly told the Mushriquis “that the Minister of Defense had given his approval to proceed” with the second phase of the deal. According to the indictment, the Mushriquis then executed the “corrupt purchase agreement.”

Based on this core conduct, the indictment charges the Mushriquis with, among other things, conspiracy to violate the FCPA and five substantive FCPA violations.

Jonathan Spiller

Spiller is described in the indictment as the “owner and President of Company A, a Florida company that was in the business of providing consulting services for companies in the law enforcement and military equipment industries.” According to the indictment, “Spiller was also the owner and manager of Company B, a Florida company that was in the business of marketing and selling law enforcement and military equipment. Company A and B were both located in Ponte Vedra Beach, Florida.”

The allegations against Spiller are substantively similar, but involved contracts to sell “rifle-mounted cameras and tactical vehicles.” The indictment alleges that Spiller agreed to proceed with the deal and that he then proceeded between May – September 2009 to inflate the price quotations, wire the commission, and otherwise take action in furterance of the deal.

The indictment also alleges that on or about October 5, 2009, Spiller was also told by the Second FBI Agent that the “Minister of Defense was pleased” with the equipment sent and the “commission the Minister of Defense had received.” The FBI agent then allegedly told Spiller “that the Minister of Defense had given his approval to proceed” with the second phase of the deal. According to the indictment, Spiller then executed the “corrupt purchase agreement.”

Based on this core conduct, the indictment charges Spiller with, among other things, conspiracy to violate the FCPA and two substantive FCPA violations.

John Benson Wier III

Wier is described in the indictment as the “President of Company A, a Florida company headquartered in St. Petersburg, Florida, that sold tactical and ballistic equipment.”

That company is SRT Supply Inc. (see here).

The allegations against Wier are substantively similar, but involved two contracts to sell “laser grips, which are laser sights for handguns.” The indictment alleges that Wier agreed to proceed with the deal and that he then proceeded between May – June 2009 to inflate the price quotations, wire the commission, and otherwise take action in furterance of the deal.

The indictment also alleges that on or about October 5, 2009, Wier was also told by the Second FBI Agent that the “Minister of Defense was pleased with the laser grips” sent and the “commission the Minister of Defense had received.” The FBI agent then allegedly told Wier “that the Minister of Defense had given his approval to proceed” with the second phase of the deal. According to the indictment, Wier then executed the “corrupt purchase agreement.”

Based on this core conduct, the indictment charges the Wier with, among other things, conspiracy to violate the FCPA and two substantive FCPA violations.

Amaro Goncalves

Goncalves is described in the indictment as “the Vice President of Sales for Company A, a United States company headquartered in Springfield, Massachusetts. Company A was a world-wide leader in the design and manufacture of firearms, firearm safety/security products, rifles, firearms systems, and accessories. The shares of Company A were publicly traded on the NASDAQ stock exchange.”

That company is Smith and Wesson Holding Corporation (see here and here for its press release).

The allegations against Goncalves are substantively similar, but involved two contracts to sell “pistols.” The indictment alleges that Goncalves agreed to proceed with the deal and that he then proceeded between May – September 2009 to inflate the price quotations, wire the commission, and otherwise take action in furterance of the deal.

The indictment also alleges that on or about October 6, 2009, Goncalves was also told by the Second FBI Agent that the “Minister of Defense was pleased with the pistols” sent and the “commission the Minister of Defense had received.” The FBI special agent then allegedly told Goncalves “that the Minister of Defense had given his approval to proceed” with the second phase of the deal. According to the indictment, Goncalves then executed the “corrupt purchase agreement.”

Based on this core conduct, the indictment charges Goncalves with, among other things, conspiracy to violate the FCPA and three substantive FCPA violations.

Pankesh Patel

Patel is described in the indictment as a United Kingdom citizen and the “Managing Director of Company A, a United Kingdom company that acts as a sales agent for companies in the law enforcement and military products industries.”

The allegations against Patel are substantively similar, but involved two contracts to sell “uniforms.” The indictment alleges that Patel agreed to proceed with the deal and that he then proceeded between May – September 2009 to inflate the price quotations, wire the commission, and otherwise take action in furterance of the deal.

The indictment also alleges that on or about October 5, 2009, Goncalves was also told by the Second FBI Agent that the “Minister of Defense was pleased with the uniforms” sent and the “commission the Minister of Defense had received.” The FBI agent then allegedly told Patel “that the Minister of Defense had given his approval to proceed” with the second phase of the deal. According to the indictment, Patel then executed the “corrupt purchase agreement.”

Based on this core conduct, the indictment charges Patel with, among other things, conspiracy to violate the FCPA and two substantive FCPA violations.

John Gregory Godsey and Mark Frederick Morales

Godsey is described in the indictment as “the owner of Company A, a Georgia company based in Decatur, Georgia, that was in the business of selling ammunition and other law enforcement and military equipment.” Morales is described as “a busines associate of Godsey” who “worked with him on deals involving Company A.”

The allegations against Godsey and Morales are substantively similar, but involved two contracts to sell “ammunition.” The indictment alleges that Godsey and Morales agreed to proceed with the deal and that they then proceeded between May – September 2009 to inflate the price quotations, wire the commission, and otherwise take action in furterance of the deal.

The indictment also alleges that on or about October 5, 2009, Godsey and Morales were also told by the Second FBI Agent that the “Minister of Defense was pleased with the ammunition” sent and the “commission the Minister of Defense had received.” The FBI agent then allegedly told Godsey and Morales “that the Minister of Defense had given his approval to proceed” with the second phase of the deal. According to the indictment, Godsey then executed the “corrupt purchase agreement.”

Based on this core conduct, the indictment charges Godsey and Morales with, among other things, conspiracy to violate the FCPA and two substantive FCPA violations.

David Painter and Lee Wares

Painter is described in the indictment as a United Kingdom citizen and “the Chairman of Subsidiary A, a company based in the United Kingdom that was in the business of marketing armored vehicles.” Wares is also described as a United Kingdom citizen and the “Director of Subsidiary A.”

According to the indictment, “the parent company of Subsidiary A” is a company based in Cincinnati, Ohio that “produces security products.”

The allegations against Painter and Ware are substantively similar, but involved two contracts to sell “night vision goggles (NVGs) and armored vehicles.” The indictment alleges that Painter and Ware agreed to proceed with the deal and that they then proceeded between May – September 2009 to inflate the price quotations, wire the commission, and otherwise take action in furterance of the deal.

The indictment also alleges that on or about October 5, 2009, Painter and Ware were also told by the Second FBI Agent that the “Minister of Defense was pleased with the NVGs” sent and the “commission the Minister of Defense had received.” The FBI agent then allegedly told Painter and Ware “that the Minister of Defense had given his approval to proceed” with the second phase of the deal. According to the indictment, Painter and Ware then executed the “corrupt purchase agreement.”

Based on this core conduct, the indictment charges Painter and Ware with, among other things, conspiracy to violate the FCPA and three substantive FCPA violations.

Israel Weisler and Michael Sacks

Weisler is described in the indictment as an “owner and Chief Executive Officer of Company A, a Kentucky company that was in the business of designing, manufacturing, and selling armor products, including body armor. Company A’s business was located in Stearns, Kentucky.” Sacks, a citizen of the United Kingdom, is described as a “co-owner and co-Chief Executive Officer of Company A.”

That company is U.S. Cavalry Inc. (see here). Of note, according to the company’s website, is that the company “set upon a quest to earn a General Services Administration Contract to ease the procurement process for our customers at GSA-authorized federal, military and state agencies. The GSA Contract allows these customers to ensure they pay a fair, predetermined price for the equipment they need.”

The allegations against Weisler and Sacks are substantively similar, but involved two contracts to sell “body armor.” The indictment alleges that Weisler and Sacks agreed to proceed with the deal and that they then proceeded between May – June 2009 to inflate the price quotations, wire the commission, and otherwise take action in furterance of the deal.

The indictment also alleges that on or about October 5, 2009, Weisler and Sacks were also told by the Second FBI Agent that the “Minister of Defense was pleased with the body armor” sent and the “commission the Minister of Defense had received.” The FBI agent then allegedly told Weisler and Sacks “that the Minister of Defense had given his approval to proceed” with the second phase of the deal. According to the indictment, Weisler and Sacks then executed the “corrupt purchase agreement.”

Based on this core conduct, the indictment charges Weisler and Sacks with, among other things, conspiracy to violate the FCPA and four substantive FCPA violations.

Yochanan Cohen

Cohen is described in the indictment as the “Chief Executive Officer of Company A, a company based in San Francisco, California, that was in the business of manufacturing security equipment, including body armor and hard armor ballistic plates.”

That company is Highcom Security Inc. (see here). The company’s website indicates that it is a certified General Services Administrator vendor.

The allegations against Cohen are substantively similar, but involved two contracts to sell “Level IV ballistic plates, which is a type of body armor.” The indictment alleges that Cohen agreed to proceed with the deal and that he then proceeded between May – August 2009 to inflate the price quotations, wire the commission, and otherwise take action in furterance of the deal.

The indictment also alleges that on or about October 5, 2009, Cohen was also told by the Second FBI Agent that the “Minister of Defense was pleased with the ballistic plates” sent and the “commission the Minister of Defense had received.” The FBI special agent then allegedly told Cohen “that the Minister of Defense had given his approval to proceed” with the second phase of the deal. According to the indictment, Cohen then executed the “corrupt purchase agreement.”

Based on this core conduct, the indictment charges Cohen with, among other things, conspiracy to violate the FCPA and three substantive FCPA violations.

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