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Second Circuit Hears Oral Argument In U.S. v. Hoskins

Judicial Decision

Judicial scrutiny of Foreign Corrupt Practices Act enforcement is rare. Appellate court judicial scrutiny even more rare. Listening to appellate court oral arguments in an FCPA appeal, let’s just say you can count those instances on one hand and have a couple of fingers left over.

Last week the Second Circuit heard oral argument in U.S. v. Hoskins and you can listen to the arguments here.

The issue before the court, as stated in the DOJ’s brief, is as follows.

“Whether a foreign person (who does not reside in the United States) can be liable for conspiring or aiding and abetting a U.S. company to violate the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act if that individual is not in the categories of principal persons covered in the statute.”

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Issues To Consider From The Rolls-Royce Enforcement Action

Issues

This previous post went in-depth into the $170 million Foreign Corrupt Practices Act enforcement action against U.K. based Rolls-Royce announced on January 17th. This post continues the analysis by highlighting additional issues to consider.

Unusual Aspect of the DPA

The Rolls-Royce DPA contains an unusual feature. Of the approximate $170 criminal penalty “$30 million will be paid to the Consumer Financial Fraud Fund.”

This has never happened before in an FCPA enforcement and set forth below is my e-mail exchange with the DOJ press office on this issue.

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Issues To Consider From The Teva Enforcement Action

Issues

This previous post went in-depth into the $519 million Foreign Corrupt Practices Act enforcement action against Teva Pharmaecutical (the first-ever FCPA enforcement action against an Israeli company, by far the largest-ever FCPA enforcement action against a pharmaceutical company, and 4th largest FCPA settlement of all-time).

Set forth below are additional issues to consider.

Timeline

As highlighted in this prior post, Teva’s FCPA scrutiny began in July 2012. Thus from start to finish the company’s FCPA scrutiny lasted approximately 4.5 years. If the DOJ and SEC want the public to view its FCPA enforcement program as legitimate, credible, and effective, it must resolve instances of FCPA scrutiny much faster.

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Issues To Consider From The Odebrecht / Braskem Enforcement Action

Issues

As highlighted in this prior post, last week’s Foreign Corrupt Practices Act enforcement action against Odebrecht / Braskem was egregious and largely centered on a business unit, the Division of Structured Operations, housed within an Odebrecht subsidiary that allegedly served as little more than a bribe-paying department for the benefit of Odebrecht and Braskem in connection with projects and other issues in Brazil and eleven other countries.

Given the egregious and wide-spread improper conduct, the Odebrecht / Braskem global (Brazil, U.S. and Switzerland) settlement of approximately $3.5 billion set a record. After accounting for various credits and deductions (including for payments to Brazil and Swiss law enforcement agencies and a claimed inability to pay) the net FCPA settlement amount (subject to potential future adjustments) was approximately $420 million (the 5th largest FCPA settlement amount of all-time). [Note, in April 2017 the DOJ trimmed the Odebrecht criminal penalty by $167 million to $93 million (it originally was $260 million). Thus, the overall net FCPA settlement amount is $252 million].

Just because the conduct was egregious does not mean that there are not legal and policy issues to consider from the enforcement action. This prior post highlighted why the Odebrecht / Braskem enforcement action was unique (the bulk of the conduct focused on Brazil and it is believed to be the first FCPA enforcement action ever against a foreign issuer for bribing its own “domestic” officials) and this post continues the analysis by highlighting additional issues to consider.

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Odebrecht / Braskem Bribery Schemes Net Approximate $420 Million FCPA Enforcement Action

oder

Yesterday, the DOJ and SEC announced (here and here) a Foreign Corrupt Practices Act enforcement action against Odebrecht S.A. (a Brazilian holding company) and Braskem S.A. (a Brazil-based petrochemical company in which Odebrecht owns 50.1% of the voting shares, 38.1% of the total share capital and which Odebrecht “effectively controlled” according to the DOJ). Braskem has American Depositary Receipts registered with the SEC and traded on the NYSE and thus the enforcement action also included an SEC component.

Perhaps because of the less than clear DOJ release (clear once one actually reads the original source documents), this action is being reported in various places as a $3.5 billion FCPA enforcement action. While that figure represents the overall global settlement amount (Brazil and Swiss law enforcement also brought related actions), yesterday’s action was most certainly not a $3.5 billion FCPA enforcement action. Not even close.

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