Top Menu

Approximately 7.5 Years After Disclosing FCPA Scrutiny, Walmart FINALLY Resolves FCPA Enforcement Action

Wal-Mart

As highlighted in this prior post, in late 2011 Walmart disclosed that it began “an internal investigation into whether certain matters, including permitting, licensing and inspections, were in compliance” with the FCPA.

So began arguably one of the most high-profile instances of corporate scrutiny in Foreign Corrupt Practices Act. history. The scrutiny FINALLY came to an end yesterday as the DOJ and SEC announced (here and here) a coordinated $282 million enforcement action. As highlighted in this prior post, Walmart disclosed this likely settlement amount in November 2017,  yet it still took approximately 1.5 additional years to formally resolve the matter.

This post summarizes the DOJ and SEC’s enforcement action concerning alleged improper conduct in the following countries: Mexico, Brazil, India and China.  Future posts will explore numerous other issues relevant to the enforcement action.

Continue Reading

So You Want To Build Hotels in Africa …

Africa

Reading the news with a pair of FCPA goggles is an occupational hazard and it was hard not to see the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act implications in this recent Wall Street Journal article titled “Global Hoteliers Take Spending Spree to Africa.

As stated in the article:  “The world’s biggest names in hospitality are battling for a slice of one of the world’s fastest-growing markets for hotels: Africa. To be sure, many African markets are notorious for issues with land rights, slow construction progress and graft. “These hotels tend to take so much longer,” said Mark Martinovic, president and CEO of Hotel Spec International Inc., a South Africa-based hotel-development consulting firm. He also cited challenges in getting raw materials through customs in the continent’s ports, saying, “I call the [African hotel] pipeline the ‘pipe dreams.’” But many of the world’s biggest names in hospitality say that despite the enduring challenges for investors in Sub-Saharan Africa, the continent’s growth prospects are strong.”

Continue Reading

Fresenius Medical Care Pays Approximately $232 Million To Resolve Its Long-Standing FCPA Scrutiny

fresenius

German healthcare firm Fresenius Medical Care AG (a company with American Depositary Receipt shares traded on the NYSE) has been under FCPA scrutiny since 2012 (no that is not a typo).

Today the DOJ and SEC announced (here and here) an approximate $232 million enforcement action ($84.7 million to the DOJ and $147 million to the SEC) against the company for alleged bribery schemes involving physicians and other healthcare personnel in Angola, Saudi Arabia, Morocco, Spain, Turkey, Gabon, Benin, Burkina Faso, Senegal, Ivory Coast, Niger, Cameroon China, Serbia, Bosnia, and Mexico.

While not specified in any of the resolution documents, the DOJ’s non-prosecution agreement and SEC’s administrative order make generic reference to the Angola and Saudi Arabia conduct involving ‘agents and employees utiliz[ing] the means and instrumentalities of U.S. interstate commerce, including the use of internet-based email accounts hosted by numerous service providers located in the United States.”

Continue Reading

The Many Issues To Consider From The Cognizant Technology Enforcement Action

Issues

Previous posts here and here highlighted the recent Foreign Corrupt Practices Act enforcement action against Cognizant Technology Solutions and two of its former executives.

This post continues the analysis by highlighting several issues to consider.

Timeline

As highlighted in this prior post, Cognizant disclosed its FCPA scrutiny in a September 2016 SEC filing. Thus from start to finish, Cognizant’s FCPA scrutiny lasted approximately 2.5 years. While 2.5 years is shorter than recent medians of over 4 years (see here), 2.5 years is still too long for FCPA scrutiny to last.

Continue Reading

Cognizant Technology Solutions Resolves $25 Million SEC Enforcement Action In Connection With Various Licenses And Permits In India

cognizant

This previous post highlighted the DOJ and SEC’s individual enforcement action against Gordon Coburn and Steven Schwartz (former executives of Cognizant Technology Solutions) in connection with a planning permit in India.

This post highlights the SEC’s enforcement action (as well as the DOJ’s so-called declination letter) against the company based on the same core conduct in which the company, without admitting or denying the SEC’s findings, agreed to pay approximately $25 million in disgorgement and prejudgement interest.

Continue Reading

Powered by WordPress. Designed by WooThemes