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Friday Roundup

Roundup

More on Major League Baseball’s FCPA scrutiny, Siemens, across the pond, ripple, and for the reading stack.

It’s all here in the Friday roundup.

MLB’s FCPA Scrutiny

This prior post highlighted Major League Baseball’s apparent FCPA scrutiny. According to this Sports Illustrated article:

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Checking In On The Siemens Monitor Case – Court Rules That The DOJ’s Withholding Of Certain Relevant Documents Is Overbroad And That Other Claimed FOIA Exemptions Are Inapplicable

Judicial Decision

Previous posts herehere, here, and here have highlighted the DOJ’s efforts (along with Siemens and its monitor) to block public release of the Monitor reports provided to the DOJ in connection with resolution of the still record-setting 2008 Siemens FCPA enforcement action.

From the beginning, I’ve had my own suspicion as to why the DOJ (and other parties) are actively seeking to block release of the Monitor reports and it has nothing to do with the issues discussed in the DOJ’s (and other parties) briefs.

In any event, in this recent 60 page opinion, Judge Rudolph Contreras (D.D.C.) ruled that the DOJ’s withholding of certain relevant documents is overbroad and that other claimed Freedom of Information Act exemptions are inapplicable.

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A Peek Into The Opaque World Of FCPA Monitorships

opendoor

Previous posts herehere, and here highlighted the DOJ’s efforts (along with Siemens and its monitor) to block public release of the Monitor reports provided to the DOJ in connection with resolution of the still record-setting 2008 Siemens FCPA enforcement action.

From the beginning, I’ve had my own suspicion as to why the DOJ (and other parties) are actively seeking to block release of the Monitor reports and it has nothing to do with the issues discussed in the DOJ’s (and other parties) briefs.

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Friday Roundup

Roundup

Quotable, FCPA issues at City Hall, and for the reading stack. It’s all here in the Friday roundup.

Quotable

In this recent post titled “Judicial Scrutiny of Corporate Monitors: Additional Uncertainty for FCPA Settlements?” Debevoise attorneys Andrew Levine, Philip Rohlik and Michael Gramer note:

“Like many other complex corporate criminal matters, FCPA matters largely get resolved without meaningful judicial oversight. […] In complex cases, corporate criminal enforcement can follow the largely consensual process that has evolved in the FCPA arena.  After a long period of investigation, in which a company often cooperates, the company and DOJ negotiate a resolution, based on legal theories and facts largely determined by the DOJ.

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Friday Roundup

Roundup

Clayton responds, from the dockets, Bitkower to FCPA Inc., and a student writing competition. It’s all here in the Friday roundup.

Clayton Responds

This previous post highlighted the FCPA portion of the recent confirmation hearing of SEC Chair nominee Jay Clayton. In follow-up written questions, Senator Sherrod Brown (D-OH) asked: “The Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA) forbids U.S. companies and their subsidiaries from paying foreign government officials to obtain or retain business. What is your specific plan for enforcement of the FCPA.”

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