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Friday Roundup

Roundup

Scrutiny alert, coincidence or FCPA-related, ripple dismissed, and more shallow commentary, and ISO 37001 laughable.  It’s all here in the Friday roundup.

Scrutiny Alert

As highlighted in this previous post, in late 2013/early 2014 United Technologies Corp. (UTC) disclosed FCPA scrutiny concerning a non-employee sales representative retained in China. Recently, the company disclosed: “On March 7, 2018, the DOJ notified UTC that it had decided to close its investigation of this matter. Based on our ongoing discussions with the SEC staff to resolve this matter, UTC recorded a charge of approximately $11 million in the second quarter of 2018.”

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Friday Roundup

Roundup

ISO 37001 airball, from the Inspector General report, scrutiny alert, good lord, marketing an impossible dream, root causes, and yes it is. It’s all here in the Friday roundup.

ISO 37001 Airball

If you have an interest in the non-story of ISO 37001 check out this podcast in which Alexandra Wrage (Trace International) asks some very good questions of a Microsoft representative.

To use a basketball analogy, the Microsoft’s reps answers were air balls full of buzzwords and cliches. 

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Legg Mason Also Ponies Up $64 Million To Resolve FCPA Enforcement Action Concerning Conduct In Libya That Occurred 9-14 Years Ago By “Only Two Mid-To-Lower Level Employees Of A Subsidiary”

LG

A few hours after the DOJ announced a net $293 million Foreign Corrupt Practices Act enforcement action against Société Générale S.A concerning conduct in Libya that occurred 9-14 years ago (see here for the prior post), the DOJ also announced that investment management firm Legg Mason also agreed to pony up $64 million to resolve a related enforcement action.

Pursuant to a three-year NPA, Legg Mason agreed to pay $64 million based on the conduct of “only two mid-to-lower level employees of a subsidiary of the company” (specifically Permal Group Ltd.). According to the DOJ: “Permal’s financial statements were consolidated into Legg Mason’s financial statements and they participated in a net revenue sharing arrangement, and all employees of Permal were subject to Legg Mason’s code of conduct.”

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FCPA Flash – A Conversation With Camilla de Silva (Joint Head of Bribery And Corruption – U.K. Serious Fraud Office)

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The FCPA Flash podcast provides in an audio format the same fresh, candid, and informed commentary about the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act and related topics as readers have come to expect from written posts on FCPA Professor.

This FCPA Flash episode is a conversation with Camilla de Silva (Joint Head of Bribery and Corruption at the U.K. Serious Fraud Office). During the podcast, de Silva discusses: whether the Bribery Act (including both “hard” and “soft” enforcement) has been successful in achieving its objectives; the SFO’s position on ISO 37001 (it doesn’t have a position); whether the Rolls-Royce enforcement action (see here for a prior post) conflicted with Article 5 of the OECD Convention; and the U.K.’s approach to multi-jurisdictional issues.

See here for a previous FCPA Flash podcast episode with Matthew Wagstaff (Joint Head of Bribery and Corruption at the U.K. Serious Fraud Office).

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Revisiting The ISO 37001 Standard

people thinking

Today’s post is from Covington & Burling attorneys Jennifer Saperstein and Benjamin Haley.

Since its release in October 2016, the International Standards Organization’s ISO 37001 Anti-Bribery Management System has generated debate among anti-corruption compliance professionals as to whether the standard represents a meaningful contribution to compliance best practices or much ado about nothing.  As we approach 18 months since the issuance of the standard, it is a good time to revisit this debate.

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