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What Others Are Saying About the “Foreign Official” Cert Petition

From this Law360 article.

Rita Glavin, a partner at Seward & Kissel who previously served as head of the DOJ’s criminal division, called [the cert petition] “tremendously significant.”  “The definition of what constitutes a foreign official has been expanding into the abyss,” Glavin said. “That’s a real problem for companies. Instrumentality pretty much becomes whatever the DOJ says it is.” Glavin compared the expansion of the foreign official provision to that of the “honest services fraud” statute — a provision that served for years as a blunt legal instrument in public corruption cases but was curtailed in the Supreme Court’s 2010 decision in Skilling v. United States. “The government was pushing that statute in cases where people could not have comfort as to where the line was drawn and conduct crossed into criminality,” Glavin said. “The Supreme Court finally put a stop to it.”

Morgan Lewis & Bockius partner George Terwilliger, who served as a top Justice Department official under presidents Ronald Reagan and George H.W. Bush, noted that companies have spent large sums of money policing activities that fall into a legal gray area under the FCPA. He said a ruling on the instrumentality language would provide helpful guidance. “To have a statute of this scope and geographical reach, where some of the key terms remain subject to legitimate debate among legal experts, is unconscionable,” said Terwilliger, who co-chairs Morgan Lewis’ white collar litigation and government investigations practice. “It’s not an appropriate way to administer the law.”

Larry Urgenson, a partner at Mayer Brown, … called [last week’s] petition “a useful landmark” for FCPA attorneys. He previously served in several leadership positions at the DOJ, including as acting deputy assistant attorney general and chief of the FCPA unit.  “It is very important in terms of whether the government is properly executing its prosecutorial powers to the right subjects and the right targets,” Urgenson said.

From this Global Investigations Review article:

Steven Michaels at Debevoise & Plimpton in New York said the petition involves issues which the current Supreme Court Justices are potentially keen to examine. “The Justices may find this case attractive, as they would hear arguments about statutory interpretation and whether the standard set forth by the Eleventh Circuit improperly encourage over-reaching by the government,” he said. “The Supreme Court likes to see criminal liability based on precision and clarity, and given the uncertainty in the law governing FCPA enforcement they may be willing to hear this case.” FCPA cases are also rarely litigated, Michaels said. This may encourage the court to grant the petition, as the court may have to wait a long time before the issue is litigated again in a court of appeals. The Supreme Court typically expects to see a split between US appeals courts before it hears a case, but such a split is also unlikely to occur soon.

John Chesley at Gibson Dunn & Crutcher in Washington, DC said the lack of a circuit split is “the main uphill battle” the petitioners will have to fight. “The lack of clarity in the FCPA’s definition of instrumentality could get the justices interested, especially Justice Antonin Scalia who has written extensively in this area, but the petitioners will nevertheless have a hard time overcoming the court’s preference for only acting when there is a split.” Chesley said the Esquenazi decision was controversial, as the Eleventh Circuit’s complex, multi-factored test for determining whether a company is a government instrumentality makes it difficult to determine whether the recipient of an alleged bribe is a foreign official. “There’s certainly a lot of concern about vagueness,” he said. “For example, one of the factors in the Esquenazi test revolves around whether companies are perceived as government entities in their home jurisdiction. How do you advise a client on that?”

Jessie Liu at Jenner & Block in Washington, DC, said Supreme Court guidance on instrumentality would be “fantastic”, but also said such guidance is unlikely in the near future. “The Eleventh Circuit’s reasoning was pretty robust,” she said. “We would probably need to see another appeals court go the opposite way for the Supreme Court to get involved, but there’s a good chance the Eleventh Circuit’s reasoning will dissuade future litigants from fighting the issue.”

Wal-Mart’s Pre-Enforcement Action Professional Fees and Expenses

In its August 14th second quarter earnings call, Wal-Mart disclosed:

“FCPA and compliance-related costs were approximately $43 million, which represented approximately $31 million for the ongoing inquires and investigations and roughly $12 million related to our global compliance program and organizational enhancements.”

Doing the math, that is approximately $662,000 in FCPA-related expenses per working day.

Over the past approximate two years, I have tracked Wal-Mart’s quarterly disclosed pre-enforcement action professional fees and expenses. While some pundits have ridiculed me for doing so, such figures are notable because, as has been noted in prior posts and in my article “Foreign Corrupt Practices Act Ripples,” settlement amounts in an actual FCPA enforcement action are often only a relatively minor component of the overall financial consequences that can result from corporate FCPA scrutiny.  Pre-enforcement action professional fees and expenses are typically the largest (in many cases to a degree of 3, 5, 10 or higher than settlement amounts) financial hit to a company under FCPA scrutiny.

While $662,000 per working day remains eye-popping, Wal-Mart’s recent figure suggests that the company’s pre-enforcement action professional fees and expenses have crested as the figures for the past three quarters were approximately $855,000, $1.1 million and $1.3 million per working day.

In the aggregate, Wal-Mart’s disclosed pre-enforcement professional fees and expenses are as follows.

FY 2013 = $157 million.

FY 2014 = $282 million.

FY 2015 (first two quarters) = $96 million.

Scrutiny Alerts and Updates

Layne Christensen Company

Layne Christensen Company has been under FCPA scrutiny since 2010 concerning conduct in Africa (see here for the prior post).  As noted in this November 2013 post, the company disclosed that it was “engaged in discussions with the DOJ and the SEC regarding a potential negotiated resolution” of the matter.

However, last week the company issued this release stating:

“The DOJ has decided to not file any charges against the Company in connection with the previously disclosed investigation into potential violations of the FCPA.  The DOJ has notified Layne that it considers the matter closed.

As previously reported by Layne, in connection with updating its FCPA policy, questions were raised internally in September 2010 about, among other things, the legality of certain payments by Layne to agents and other third parties interacting with government officials in certain countries in Africa.  The audit committee of the board of directors engaged outside counsel to conduct an internal investigation to review these payments with assistance from outside accounting firms.  Layne has been consistent and forthcoming in providing voluntary disclosure to the DOJ and the SEC regarding the results of the investigation, and has cooperated fully with those agencies in connection with their review of the matter.  The parallel investigation by the SEC remains open and the Company is actively engaged in settlement discussions with the SEC to resolve this matter.

Layne had previously accrued a reserve of $10.4 million for the settlement of the investigations. Based on the decision by the DOJ, the Company will reduce the accrual related to this investigation by approximately $5.3 million, which will be reflected in Layne’s results of operations for the second fiscal quarter ended July 31, 2014.

David A.B. Brown, President & CEO, commented, “We are very pleased to conclude the DOJ investigation without any charges being brought against Layne and we hope to settle the SEC investigation in the near future. From the very beginning, we have maintained a position of full disclosure and complete cooperation with the authorities and have worked diligently to implement remedial measures to enhance our internal controls and compliance efforts. Based on conversations with the DOJ, we understand that our voluntary disclosure, cooperation and remediation efforts have been recognized and appreciated by the staff of the DOJ and that the resolution of the investigation reflects these matters.”

Qualcomm

As noted in this previous post, in April 2014 Qualcomm disclosed:

“As previously disclosed, the Company discovered, and as a part of its cooperation with these investigations informed the SEC and the DOJ of, instances in which special hiring consideration, gifts or other benefits (collectively, benefits) were provided to several individuals associated with Chinese state-owned companies or agencies. Based on the facts currently known, the Company believes the aggregate monetary value of the benefits in question to be less than $250,000, excluding employment compensation.

On March 13, 2014, the Company received a Wells Notice from the SEC’s Los Angeles Regional Office indicating that the staff has made a preliminary determination to recommend that the SEC file an enforcement action against the Company for violations of the anti-bribery, books and records and internal control provisions of the FCPA. The bribery allegations relate to benefits offered or provided to individuals associated with Chinese state-owned companies or agencies.

[…]

On April 4, 2014, the Company made a Wells submission to the staff of the Los Angeles Regional Office explaining why the Company believes it has not violated the FCPA and therefore enforcement action is not warranted.”

Is this recent New York Times article the reason for Qualcomm’s FCPA scrutiny?  The article states that “an adviser to a Chinese government antitrust committee has been dismissed, accused of accepting payments from Qualcomm, an American technology company under investigation in China on suspicion of antitrust violations.”  According to the article, Qualcomm “had made ‘large payments’ to Zhang Xinzhu, an economist at the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, while he also was an adviser on an antimonopoly committee under the State Council, China’s cabinet.”  As noted in this Reuters article, Qualcomm said “it had no direct financial links with an antitrust expert sacked from a government advisory post after state media reported he had received payments from the firm.”

Derwick Associates / ProEnergy Services

This August 2013 post predicted FCPA scrutiny for Derwick Associates based on a civil RICO lawsuit filed alleging conduct in Venezuela.

Sure enough.  This recent Wall Street Journal article reports:

“The U.S. Department of Justice and the Manhattan district attorney’s office are probing Derwick Associates … a company awarded hundreds of millions of dollars in contracts in little more than a year to build power plants in Venezuela, shortly after the country’s power grid began to sputter in 2009.  […]  ProEnergy Services, a Sedalia, Mo.-based engineering, procurement and construction company that sold dozens of turbines to Derwick and helped build the plants, is also under investigation …”.

Cubist Pharmaceuticals

This previous post highlighted the FCPA scrutiny of Optimer Pharmaceuticals.  The company has since been acquired by Cubist Pharmaceutical which recently disclosed as follows.

Optimer U.S. Governmental Investigations

We are continuing to cooperate with the investigations by the SEC and the U.S. Department of Justice in their review of potential violations by Optimer of certain applicable laws, which occurred prior to our acquisition of Optimer. The investigations relate to an attempted share grant by Optimer and certain related matters in 2011, including a potentially improper payment to a research laboratory involving an individual associated with the share grant, that may have violated certain applicable laws, including the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA). Optimer had already taken remedial steps in response to its internal investigation of these matters; nonetheless, these events could result in lawsuits being filed against us or Optimer and certain of Optimer’s former employees and directors, or certain of our employees. Such persons could also be the subject of criminal or civil enforcement proceedings and we may be required to indemnify such persons for any costs or losses incurred in connection with such proceedings. We cannot predict the ultimate resolution of these matters, whether we or such persons will be charged with violations of applicable civil or criminal laws, or whether the scope of the investigations will be extended to new issues. We also cannot predict what potential penalties or other remedies, if any, the authorities may seek against us, any of our employees, or any of Optimer’s former employees and directors, or what the collateral consequences may be of any such government actions. We do not have any amounts accrued related to potential penalties or other remedies related to these matters as of June 30, 2014, and cannot estimate a reasonably possible range of loss. In the event any such lawsuit is filed or enforcement proceeding is initiated, we could be subject to a variety of risks and uncertainties that could have material adverse effects on our business, results of operations and financial condition.”

Quotable

Returning to a theme previously explored in the “The Bribery Racket” (Forbes) and “FCPA Inc. and the Business of Bribery” (Wall Street Journal), not to mention my own article “The Facade of FCPA Enforcement,” Robert Amsterdam writes in this Forbes piece titled “When Anti-Corruption Becomes Corrupted,” as follows.

“Like many laws born out of politics, anti-corruption has become alarmingly mired in ambiguity, abuse, and misapplication. In the United Kingdom, the introduction of the Bribery Act, in conjunction with the U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA), means that now essentially the globe is covered with a bundle of vague principles and unfettered prosecutorial discretions that leaves multinational businesses dangerously exposed. Not only are the laws vague, but they are accompanied by incredible powers on behalf of prosecutors, who can issue orders to freeze assets, cripple business operations, harass employees, and destroy reputations, all before you’ve even had a chance to defend yourself in court. This ambiguity is heightened by the outsourcing of prosecutorial responsibilities to white collar criminal “defense” lawyers, who have embraced emerging regimes of “self reporting,” placing the onus on corporate decisions to avoid the stigma of criminal charges, requiring them to inform on themselves or their own senior employees, often in the absence of any substance.

[…]

[P]art of the problem is the proliferation of Deferred Prosecution Agreements (DPAs) and Non-Prosecution Agreements (NPAs), which entail the company surrendering its rights to defense and admitting to a series of accusations that are not subjected to exhaustive judicial scrutiny.

[…]

Many big law firms now feature celebrity prosecutors who formerly worked in enforcement, so they see their new job as a continuation of their old job, specializing in negotiating NDAs and DPAs.

In several cases that we are familiar with, the self-reporting doctrine has ended up causing much more damage than benefit. Particularly with respect to non-public companies, a better strategy would be to fight against any untrue or exaggerated accusation, uphold basic rights to defense, take internal measures to address any issues, but above all else, refuse to be bullied into a position of confessing to actions that the company has not committed or destroying the careers and personal lives of a handful of executives to serve as the sacrifice to save the company.

We do fear that if this trend of prosecutorial hubris is not checked, we may face a very dangerous future. The potential consequences of these laws, which include lengthy periods of incarceration, could morph beyond big business and impact other areas of society, where the accused are always guilty, where rights to defense do not exist, and dirty deals replace due process.

The philosophy of self reporting, impacting as it does the lives and reputations of executives in major corporations, requires a dramatic rethink. We must carefully examine the incentives driving prosecutors and how they choose their targets, review sentencing guidelines in both the United States and United Kingdom, and reinforce the core values of the presumption of innocence and due process in order to effectively address genuine issues of corruption practices abroad while sparing compliant businesses from the burden of unnecessary harassment.”

In-House Position

Avon Products, Inc., is looking for an attorney to join the Ethics & Compliance team.

The Regional Legal & Compliance Counsel (RLCC), Latam, reports to the Regional Ethics & Compliance Director for compliance matters and V.P. & General Counsel, Legal, Ethics & Compliance, Latam for legal matters.  The position resides in Miami.  The RLCC plays an active role in the execution of the Global Ethics & Compliance program and provides legal support to the region.  The Company’s Ethics & Compliance program seeks to minimize exposure of corporate and regulatory risks through company guidance and controls.  Working with Legal Department colleagues, especially the legal leadership and Compliance Counsels in the markets and the Regional Compliance Director, the RLCC counsels on compliance-related questions, implementation and execution of policies and procedures, with a particular focus on the anti-corruption policy, as well as assists with the design and implementation of compliance enhancements, as necessary.  The RLCC may spend appreciable time implementing anti-corruption policy controls, such as those concerning third party engagements, gift giving, and donations, thereby facilitating legitimate commercial activities while mitigating risk exposure.

Interested candidates may send their CV directly to Gregory Bates (Director, Ethics & Compliance, Latam) (gregory.bates@avon.com)  and should also apply via the http://www.avoncompany.com/aboutavon/careers/index.html.

Friday Roundup

FCPA scrutiny equals a raise, Qualcomm declines to cave, scrutiny alerts, industry specific risks, survey says, gaps in the narrative, a pulse on FCPA Inc., quotable and not quotable, and for the reading stack.  It’s all here in the Friday Roundup

FCPA Scrutiny Equals A Raise

There are some things that happen in the FCPA space that cause one to scratch their head.

Such as a company being under FCPA scrutiny paying audit committee members more money because of the time devoted to the FCPA scrutiny.  In its recent proxy statement, Wal-Mart disclosed as follows.

“Since November 2011, the Audit Committee has been conducting an internal investigation into, among other things, alleged violations of the U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act of 1977 (the “FCPA”) and other alleged crimes or misconduct in connection with foreign subsidiaries, and whether prior allegations of such violations and/or misconduct were appropriately handled by Walmart. The Audit Committee and Walmart have engaged outside counsel from a number of law firms and other advisors who are assisting in the ongoing investigation of these matters. This investigation has resulted in a significant increase in the workload of the Audit Committee members since the commencement of this investigation, and during fiscal 2014, the Audit Committee conducted 13 additional meetings related to the investigation and compliance matters, and Audit Committee members received frequent updates via conference calls and other means of communication with outside counsel and other advisors related to the investigation. As it had done in November 2012 in recognition of the significantly increased commitment of time required of the Audit Committee to conduct this investigation, in November 2013, the CNGC (Compensation, Nomination, and Governance Committee) and the Board approved an additional annual fee in the amount of $75,000 payable to each Audit Committee member other than the Audit Committee Chair for fiscal 2014, and an additional annual fee in the amount of $100,000 payable to the Audit Committee Chair for fiscal 2014. These amounts were prorated for directors who served on the Audit Committee during a portion of fiscal 2014. The CNGC determined the amounts of these additional fees based on (1) the CNGC’s and the Board’s review of the significant additional time and effort that had been required of the Audit Committee members during the previous Board term in connection with these matters, which were in addition to the time spent by the Audit Committee with respect to the Audit Committee’s other duties and its regularly scheduled meetings, and (2) the expectation that the Audit Committee members would continue to expend approximately the same amount of time and effort in discharging their responsibilities as Audit Committee members at least through the remainder of fiscal 2014.”

Qualcomm Declines to Cave

Rare are so-called Wells Notices in the FCPA context for the simple reason that few issuers actually publicly push back against the SEC.  Thus, the below disclosure by Qualcomm earlier this week stands out:

“Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) Formal Order of Private Investigation and Department of Justice Investigation : On September 8, 2010, the Company was notified by the SEC’s Los Angeles Regional office of a formal order of private investigation. The Company understands that the investigation arose from a “whistleblower’s” allegations made in December 2009 to the audit committee of the Company’s Board of Directors and to the SEC. In 2010, the audit committee completed an internal review of the allegations with the assistance of independent counsel and independent forensic accountants. This internal review into the whistleblower’s allegations and related accounting practices did not identify any errors in the Company’s financial statements. On January 27, 2012, the Company learned that the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Southern District of California/Department of Justice (collectively, DOJ) had begun an investigation regarding the Company’s compliance with the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA). As previously disclosed, the audit committee conducted an internal review of the Company’s compliance with the FCPA and its related policies and procedures with the assistance of independent counsel and independent forensic accountants. The audit committee has completed this comprehensive review, made findings consistent with the Company’s findings described below and suggested enhancements to the Company’s overall FCPA compliance program. In part as a result of the audit committee’s review, the Company has made and continues to make enhancements to its FCPA compliance program, including implementation of the audit committee’s recommendations.

As previously disclosed, the Company discovered, and as a part of its cooperation with these investigations informed the SEC and the DOJ of, instances in which special hiring consideration, gifts or other benefits (collectively, benefits) were provided to several individuals associated with Chinese state-owned companies or agencies. Based on the facts currently known, the Company believes the aggregate monetary value of the benefits in question to be less than $250,000, excluding employment compensation.

On March 13, 2014, the Company received a Wells Notice from the SEC’s Los Angeles Regional Office indicating that the staff has made a preliminary determination to recommend that the SEC file an enforcement action against the Company for violations of the anti-bribery, books and records and internal control provisions of the FCPA. The bribery allegations relate to benefits offered or provided to individuals associated with Chinese state-owned companies or agencies. The Wells Notice indicated that the recommendation could involve a civil injunctive action and could seek remedies that include disgorgement of profits, the retention of an independent compliance monitor to review the Company’s FCPA policies and procedures, an injunction, civil monetary penalties and prejudgment interest.

A Wells Notice is not a formal allegation or finding by the SEC of wrongdoing or violation of law. Rather, the purpose of a Wells Notice is to give the recipient an opportunity to make a “Wells submission” setting forth reasons why the proposed enforcement action should not be filed and/or bringing additional facts to the SEC’s attention before any decision is made by the SEC as to whether to commence a proceeding. On April 4, 2014, the Company made a Wells submission to the staff of the Los Angeles Regional Office explaining why the Company believes it has not violated the FCPA and therefore enforcement action is not warranted.

The Company is continuing to cooperate with the SEC and the DOJ, but is unable to predict the outcome of their investigations or any action that the SEC may decide to file.”

Needless to say, this instance of FCPA scrutiny will be interesting to follow.

Scrutiny Alerts

Hiring Probes Expand

Reuters reports here:

“U.S. government agencies that have been probing banks’ hiring of children of powerful Chinese officials are expanding existing investigations in other industries across Asia to include hiring practices …The U.S. Justice Department and the Securities and Exchange Commission have been asking global companies in a range of industries including oil and gas, telecommunications and consumer products for information about their hiring practices to determine if they could amount to bribery …”.

For more on JPMorgan’s FCPA scrutiny which got this started, see here.  For more on so-called industry sweeps, see here.

Delphi Automotive

Delphi Automotive disclosed in it most recent SEC quarterly filing as follows:

“During the first quarter of 2014, Delphi identified certain potentially improper payments, made by certain manufacturing facility employees in China, that may violate certain provisions of the U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (the “FCPA”). Under the oversight of Delphi’s Audit Committee of the Board of Directors, Delphi has engaged outside counsel to assist in the review of these matters, and to evaluate existing controls and compliance policies and procedures. This review remains ongoing. Violations of the FCPA could result in criminal and/or civil liabilities and other forms of penalties or sanctions. Delphi has voluntarily disclosed these matters to the U.S. Department of Justice and the SEC, and is cooperating fully with these agencies. Although Delphi does not expect the outcome of this review to have a material adverse impact on the Company, there can be no assurance as to the ultimate outcome of these matters at this time.”

United Technologies

United Technologies disclosed in its most recent SEC quarterly filing as follows:

“Non-Employee Sales Representative Investigation

In December 2013 and January 2014, UTC made voluntary disclosures to the United States Department of Justice, the Securities and Exchange Commission Division of Enforcement and the United Kingdom’s Serious Fraud Office to report the status of its internal investigation regarding a non-employee sales representative retained by United Technologies International Operations, Inc. (UTIO) and International Aero Engines (IAE) for the sale of Pratt & Whitney and IAE engines and aftermarket services, respectively, in China. On April 7, 2014, the SEC notified UTC that it is conducting a formal investigation and issued a subpoena to UTC seeking production of documents related to the disclosures. UTC is cooperating fully with the investigation. Because the investigation is at an early stage, we cannot predict its outcome or the consequences thereof at this time. At the outset of the internal investigation, UTIO and IAE suspended all commission payments to the sales representative, and UTIO and IAE have not resumed making any payments. This led to two claims by the sales representative for unpaid commissions: a civil lawsuit filed
against UTIO and UTC and an arbitration claim against IAE. We are contesting the lawsuit and the arbitration claim. We do not believe that the resolution of the lawsuit or the arbitration will have a material adverse effect on our competitive position, results of operations, cash flows or financial condition.”

Industry Specific Risk

The reasons why companies become the subject of FCPA scrutiny are often unique to the industry the company is in.  This is why FCPA compliance is best tailored to a company’s unique risk profile as informed by a risk assessment.

This recent Wall Street Journal Risk & Compliance post from the Dow Jones Global Compliance Symposium is informative in collecting industry insight.

“Technology. Melissa Lea, Chief Global Compliance Officer, SAP AG. Profit margins for distributors are flexible in tech as so much of the cost is related to labor. And that flexibility offers room for partners to try to pad expenses to pay bribes. “Any time you hear about flexibility it opens the door for corruption,” said Ms. Lea, who noted that authorities have recently cracked down on bribery in the technology sector, once thought to be amongst the cleanest industries.

Pharmaceuticals. Rady A. Johnson, Chief Compliance & Risk Officer, Pfizer Inc. Drug companies pay doctors for a variety of consulting services and often invite them to attend events to promote their products. But since it’s these same doctors that prescribe drugs, pharmaceutical companies need to ensure that fancy conferences and payments for services are not cover for bribes. “We can’t do our job without interacting with health care professionals,” Mr. Johnson said. But companies need to ensure those interactions are appropriate and well defined, he said. In 2012, Pfizer agreed to pay more than $60 million to settle investigations into improper payments made to doctors and foreign officials.

Banks. W.C. Turner Herbert, Director of Anti-Corruption, Bank of America Corp.  Lately in the banking sector, corruption concerns have centered on hiring the relatives of foreign officials in exchange for business. In the past few years, U.S. authorities have investigated a number of banks over allegations of the practice, including Goldman Sachs Group Inc. and J.P. Morgan Chase & Co. “Its a new area of enforcement without much precedence,” Mr. Herbert said. While hiring well-connected people shouldn’t, by itself, be a red flag, compliance officers need to ensure the selection is done on “merit and the business objectives” of the job, he said. “What draws red flags is if he’s not qualified,” Mr. Herbert said.

Survey Says

In connection with the above-mentioned Dow Jones Global Compliance Symposium, Dow Jones released this “Anti-Corruption Survey Results 2014.”  The survey was conducted on-line “among compliance professionals worldwide” and 383 responses “were completed among companies with anti-corruption programs.”  It is difficult to assess survey results without knowing the precise questions asked, but the Dow Jones survey does contain some interesting nuggets.

Such as “approximately 30% of companies spend $1 million or more on anti-corruption staff and policies.”

In “Revisiting a Foreign Corrupt Practices Act Compliance Defense,” I suggest that the current FCPA enforcement environment does not adequately recognize a company’s good faith commitment to FCPA compliance and does not provide good corporate citizens a sufficient return on their compliance investments.

Compliance defense opponents (such as the DOJ) like to point out that such a defense will result in “paper compliance” and “check-a-box” exercises.  Such clichés, however, ignore the reality of the situation – this many companies are making substantial investments of time and money in pro-active compliance policies and procedures.

One irony of course is that several former DOJ FCPA enforcement attorneys who have criticized a compliance defense as resulting in “paper compliance” and “check-a-box” exercises now devote a substantial portion of their private practice advising companies on FCPA compliance.

Gaps in the Narrative

You know the narrative.

In 2002, an accounting partnership (Arthur Anderson) was convicted of obstruction of justice for shredding documents related to its audit of Enron.  Even though the Supreme Court ultimately tossed the conviction, Arthur Anderson essentially went out of business.  Because of this, in the minds of some, the DOJ can’t criminally charge business organizations with crimes and thus the DOJ has crafted alternative resolution vehicles such as non-prosecution and deferred prosecution agreements to avoid the perceived collateral consequences of a criminal indictment or conviction.

Never mind that the narrative is based on a false premise.  (See here for the guest post and article by Gabriel Markoff titled “Arthur Anderson and the Myth of the Corporate Death Penalty).

Nevertheless, the narrative persists and is accepted by some as gospel truth.

However, perhaps you have heard that in early April Pacific Gas & Electric Corporation (PG&E – a public company) was criminally charged with multiple violations of the Natural Gas Pipeline Safety Act.

The company’s stock is still trading (in fact it is up since the criminal charges were announced), it is still employing people, and it is still operating its business.

Recognizing the fallacy of the narrative is important for corporate leaders of businesses subject to DOJ scrutiny in the FCPA context or otherwise.  Defenses can be mounted and the DOJ can and should be put to its burden of proof more often.

A Pulse on FCPA Inc.

Law360 highlights “Four Practices Areas Generating Big Billable Hours.”  As to the FCPA the article notes:

“The Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, which mandates certain accounting transparency requirements and gives the U.S. government the power to pursue businesses that bribe foreign officials, is creating long workdays for attorneys throughout the world.  “If Foreign Corrupt Practices Act were a stock, I wish I would have held it,” said William Devaney, co-chair of  Venable LLP’s FCPA and anti-corruption practice group. “We’ve seen huge growth in the practice area since 2004, and with the government’s current focus on FCPA, it’s safe to say anti-corruption enforcement will be around for a long time.”  After the FCPA was amended in 1998 to include additional anti-bribery provisions, the U.S. government began actively applying the FCPA to not only large companies but also their smaller counterparts.  As a result, Devaney says, a lot of midmarket and smaller companies are now coming into the FCPA compliance fold after acknowledging their obligations under the law, resulting in a surge in demand.
And according to Aaron G. Murphy, a partner with Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld LLP, foreign countries passing legislation similar to the FCPA will create an explosion of fraud investigations that begin abroad but later will involve the U.S. Department of Justice.  Murphy said the FCPA stood as one of the lone anti-corruption laws in the world for 20 years, then in the mid-1990s, numerous foreign governments adopted similar rules to punish local and international corruption. “No politician has ever been elected on a ‘get softer on corruption’ ticket,” Murphy said. “If anti-corruption laws get modified, they will probably get stronger, not weaker. So we likely won’t see, 20 years from now, attorneys reminiscing about when companies had to deal with corruption laws. This practice area is here to stay.”

That the FCPA practice is here to stay is all the more reason to elevate your FCPA knowledge and practical skills at the FCPA Institute.

The three other practice areas highlighted in the article were:  export controls and trade sanctions; civil false claims act; and patent litigation and patent trolls.

Quotable

The White House recently announced that President Obama named Kirkland & Ellis partner W. Neil Eggleston to be White House Counsel (see here).  FCPA Professor has highlighted in the past (see here and here) certain of Eggleston’s spot-on comments regarding the FCPA or related issues.

In this interview Eggleston stated: “I worry that [NPAs and DPAs] will become a substitute for a prosecutor deciding – this is not an appropriate case to bring – there is no reason to subject this corporation to corporate criminal liability. In the old days, they would have dropped the case. Now, they have the back up of seeking a deferred or non prosecution agreement, when in fact the case should not have been pursued at all. That’s what I’m worried about – an easy out.”

In another interview, Eggleston was asked “what is an important issue or case relevant to your practice area and why” and stated: “We are beginning to see the development of case law in the FCPA area, which I believe is good for the process. Most of these cases have been settled. When that occurs, defendants have little incentive to refuse to agree to novel Department of Justice theories of prosecution or jurisdiction, so long as the penalty is acceptable. The department then cites its prior settlement as precedent when settling later ones. But no court approved the earlier settlement, and the prior settlement should have no precedential value in favor of the DOJ in later settlements. As the DOJ increases its prosecution of individuals, we will see many more trials, which will give rise to courts, not the DOJ, interpreting the statute.”

Not Quotable

DOJ Deputy Attorney General James Cole was a keynote speaker earlier this week at the Dow Jones Global Compliance Symposium.   According to the event agenda, the title was “What the Justice Department Has in Its Sights” and described as follows.

“From foreign bribery to insider trading, the U.S. Department of Justice has been at the forefront of rigorous enforcement that has forced companies to treat compliance seriously. We interview James Cole, deputy attorney general, about where the department is focusing its efforts now.”

I reached out to the DOJ Press Office for a transcript of Mr. Cole’s remarks and was told “we don’t have one.”

It is unfortunate that public officials speak about matters of public interest at private conferences that charge thousands of dollars to attend.

Reading Stack

The FCPA Guidance was sort of interesting to read, but as noted in my article “Grading the FCPA Guidance” it lacks any legal authority or effect.  A hat tip to the Tax Law Prof Blog for highlighting a recent U.S. Tax Court decision finding that IRS Guidance is “not binding precedent” nor “substantial authority” for a tax position.

The New York Times here goes in-depth on Dmitry Firtash, the Ukrainian businessman recently criminally charged in connection with an alleged bribery scheme involving Indian licenses (see here for the prior post).

An informative three-part series (here, here and here) by Tom Fox (FCPA Compliance & Ethics Blog) regarding gifts, travel and entertainment.

Miller & Chevalier’s FCPA Spring 2014 Review is here.

Complying With The Foreign Corrupt Practices Act: A Practical Primer

[A new job has been posted to the Jobs Board – see here.  Both job seekers and organizations seeking to hire individuals with FCPA or related experience will benefit from a wide selection of job listings, so please spread the word and send the job link to your HR department and professional contacts]

This “new era” of FCPA enforcement has resulted in many things.  From my perspective, one of the best things it has resulted in is increased attention of the FCPA and FCPA compliance among academics and students.

The ABA Criminal Justice Section’s Global Anti-Corruption Task Force (here) recently published “Complying With the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act:  A Practical Primer” (here).  The report is authored by University of Chicago Law Students Salen Churi, David Finkelstein, Joe Mueller; University of Chicago Law School faculty Dean David Zarfes, Michael Bloom, and Sean Kramer;  and Corporate Lab participants John Frank and Michel Gahard (both of Microsoft).  The University of Chicago Corporate Lab (see here) objective is “to provide students with ‘real-world’ experience and context, to prepare them to become well-rounded legal practitioners with sound legal and business judgment, and to provide them with opportunities to work on cutting-edge projects with multinational companies.”

Among other things, the purpose of “Complying With the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act:  A Practical Primer” is to provide “a framework for developing effective [FCPA] compliance programs.”  As the report notes, “[t]he available guidance from the government on how to comply with the FCPA’s requirements and prohibitions is extremely limited” and “the guidance that the government has made available is vague, disjointed, and sparse.”

The report contains a comprehensive overview of the “purposes of a compliance program,” the “facets of a compliance program,” “sources of guidance in crafting a compliance program” and various “metrics for an effective compliance program.”  However, contrary to the apparent suggestion in the report, the comprehensive FCPA best practices policies and procedures identified do not “protect companies from exposure to [FCPA] liability.”

This big-picture issue was presumably beyond the scope of the report, but it is the issue I addressed in my recent scholarship “Revisiting a Foreign Corrupt Practices Act Compliance Defense” (see here – forthcoming Wisconsin Law Review).  The comprehensive FCPA policies and procedures thoroughly discussed in the University of Chicago report should matter, as a matter of law (not merely in the opaque, inconsistent and unpredictable world of DOJ decision making),  when a non-executive employee or agent acts contrary to those policies and procedures and in violation of the FCPA.

*****

Qualcomm is a company with a long list of awards and recognition (see here) such as a Fortune “most admired company” and a Barron’s “most respected company.”  Although the specific facts of Qualcomm’s disclosure are not yet known, on perhaps a related note to the topics discussed above, the company disclosed yesterday in its  10-Q filing (here) as follows.  “On January 27, 2012, the Company learned that the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Southern District of California/DOJ has begun a preliminary investigation regarding the Company’s compliance with the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA), a topic about which the SEC is also inquiring. The Company believes that it is in compliance with the requirements of the FCPA and will continue to cooperate with both agencies.”

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