Top Menu

Checking In On Joint Task Force Alpha

northerntri

As highlighted in this prior post, in June 2021 U.S. Attorney General Merrick Garland “announced a series of steps that the Department of Justice is taking to address the threats posed by both corruption and by transnational human smuggling and trafficking networks” in Central America.

Through the establishment of so-called “Joint Task Force Alpha” the goal was “to enhance U.S. enforcement efforts against the most prolific and dangerous human smuggling and trafficking groups operating in Mexico and the Northern Triangle countries of Guatemala, El Salvador, and Honduras.”

According to the DOJ release: “Joint Task Force Alpha will also complement the Justice Department’s efforts to fight corruption.  The Justice Department will increase its focus on investigations, prosecutions, and asset recoveries relating to corruption in Northern Triangle countries through its Foreign Corrupt Practices Act enforcement program, counternarcotics prosecutions, and Kleptocracy Asset Recovery Initiative.”

Granted, FCPA enforcement activity is, to a large degree, a reflection of the extent to which companies subject to the FCPA do business in a particular country and the type of business conducted.

Granted, FCPA investigations tend to last 3+ years on average (despite the DOJ previously saying that its “intent is for our FCPA investigations to be measured in months, not years”).

Nevertheless, it is interesting to note that over three years has passed since the DOJ stated it would “increase its focus on investigations, prosecutions, and asset recoveries relating to corruption in Northern Triangle countries through [among other things] its Foreign Corrupt Practices Act enforcement program,” yet there have been no FCPA enforcement actions concerning conduct in the Northern Triangle countries of Guatemala, El Salvador, and Honduras.

Powered by WordPress. Designed by WooThemes