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Friday Roundup

Roundup

Acquitted, scrutiny alert, under scrutiny again, across the pond, and compassionate release. It’s all here in the Friday roundup.

Acquittals

The so-called conventional wisdom in the U.S. is that business organizations under Foreign Corrupt Practices Act scrutiny (particularly publicly-traded corporations) simply can’t put the DOJ (or SEC for that matter) to its burden of proof in an enforcement action because it is too risky and may result in a “death sentence” for the company.

As highlighted in this post, the conventional wisdom is b.s., but the narrative still persists. In other countries however, corporations more frequently put government enforcement agencies to their burdens of proof by making factual and legal arguments.

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Acting Assistant AG Rabbitt Talks White-Collar Crime

rabbitt

Recently Acting Assistant Attorney General Brian Rabbitt delivered this virtual speech to a White Collar Crime workshop.

As excerpted below, Rabbitt touched upon a variety of white-collar crime topics including individual accountability, DOJ policy, and data analytics.

Regarding white-collar crime generally, Rabbitt stated:

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Pfizer In The News For Two Materially Different Reasons

pfizer

In recent days, Pfizer has been in the news cycle for two materially different reasons.

Indeed, the juxtaposition is striking.

First, Pfizer (a company that resolved an approximate $60 million Foreign Corrupt Practices Act enforcement action in 2012 concerning conduct in Bulgaria, China, Croatia, Czech Republic, Italy, Kazakhstan, Russia, and Serbia) has been under renewed FCPA scrutiny since 2019 and recently disclosed as follows:

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Friday Roundup

Roundup

Fear based marketing, not a victim, dismissed, and for the reading stack.

It’s all here in the Friday roundup.

Fear Based Marketing

Another example of lawyers trying to market the COVID-19 situation by asserting that “the novel and exigent circumstances brought on by the pandemic significantly increase companies’ risk exposure under the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act and global anti-bribery laws.”

The piece even uses the personal protective equipment hypothetical that not even top DOJ officials seemed to be concerned about. (See here).

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